Tag Archives: Corruption

Fountain in Marikina Bridge- no where to find

Ayon sa Abstract of Bid proposal– Ang Marikina City ay maglalagay ng dalawang Fountain sa magkabilang dulo ng ilalim ng tulay. Ito ang nakasaad sa isang dokumento na Abstract of Bid Proposal na may petsang April 17, 2013. Bagama’t ang kopya ng Bid Proposal ay hindi kumpleto, ito ay nagpapatutuo na may bidding na naganap para sa nasabing proyekto. Ang dokumneto ay nagpapakita na may isang sumali sa nasabing bidding. Hangang sa oras na isinusulat ang artikulong ito ay walang Fountain na nakikita sa nasabing lugar na tinutukoy sa dokumneto. Sa pagtatanong-tanong sa mga taong madalas sa lugar, ayon sa kanila wala at hindi nagkaroon ng fountain sa lugar. Click to view the Abstract of Bid Proposal

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Zero casualties

EDITORIAL- The Philippine Star

The government is aiming for zero casualties as it maps out measures for disaster preparedness, according to the Department of the Interior and Local Government. It’s an ambitious goal for the DILG, but it’s good to aim for the ideal as the nation marks Disaster Preparedness Week.

Among the initiatives to be launched starting today, apart from regular flood drills, is a three-year program to remove informal dwellers along waterways, relocate them, and make sure they don’t return. The DILG counts 15,773 families squatting along six major waterways in Metro Manila. Apart from the Pasig River, the waterways include the Manggahan Floodway, where informal settlers were among the worst victims of torrential flooding at the height of Typhoon Ondoy in 2009.

According to a study released recently by the World Bank, natural disasters present a serious development challenge for East Asian and Pacific countries, with the poor often the most affected. Over 1.6 billion people have been affected by disasters in the Asia-Pacific since 2000, with the region accounting for 61 percent of global losses from disasters in the past 20 years and 40 percent of suffering from flooding in the past three decades.

The World Bank study pointed out that disaster risk has become a major issue in poverty alleviation, with natural disasters derailing long-term growth and diverting state resources from essential services and development projects. The study also noted that among the most vulnerable to disasters are rapidly growing cities in East Asia.

Economic losses from disasters have been increasing in recent years, with the figures 15 times higher in the 1990s than in the 1950s, according to the World Bank report. In 2011, the costliest on record, economic losses in the Asia-Pacific amounted to $259 billion in the first nine months alone, accounting for 80 percent of the global total. The most affected were Pacific island nations.

The Philippines, which also faces the Pacific, is no stranger to disasters, with scores of lives lost and billions in crops and property destroyed annually from typhoons, floods and earthquakes. The nation cannot afford not to give high priority to disaster preparedness.

Think tank finds May 13 polls ‘questionable’

Prof. Bobby Tuazon, Director for Policy Studies at think tank Center for People Empowerment in Governance (CenPEG) on Wednesday said the May 13 midterm polls were unreliable, citing several aspects of non-compliance with election laws.

“Kwestyunable [dahil] ung proseso na dinaanan ng midterm elections—ranging from patuloy na non-compliance sa mahigpit na election provisions—digital signature, verifiability feature [hanggang] itong nangyaring premature proclamation,” Tuazon said in an interview aired over GMA News TV’s “News to Go”

Tuazon added that the observation was not just CenPEG’s alone, as other election watchdogs also saw the poll results as unreliable.

“Kabilang na diyan ang AES (Automated Election System) watch at ilan pang kapatid dito sa election monitoring, ay nagkakaisa sila na kwestyunable ang naging conduct at naging resulta ng midterm election,” he said.

Tuason pointed out that to date, around 10 million votes have yet to be counted and these “missing” votes gave the elections a sense of confusion.

“‘Yung the fact na halos 13 thousand ER’s (election returns) ay hindi pa talagang nata-transmit, equivalent iyon to 8 million to 10 million votes that remained to be unaccounted for; pinaka latest ang discrepancies na nakita roon sa kalahati ng mga RMA (Random Manual Audit) areas,” he said.

“Lahat ng ito, tingin namin, nagdudulot ng pangamba at agam agam sa question na was the vote really counted? Sino ba talaga actual na nanalo at natalo lalo na sa senatorial race?” he added.

Accuracy rating

Tuazon also brought up the much debated accuracy rating of the PCOS machines, saying that even before the elections were conducted, the machines failed to meet parameters during tests.

“If we go back to the discovery, na natagpuan namin, na accuracy rating of PCOS system ng Smartmatic, batay doon sa idinaos na mock elections sa House of Representatives noong July 24 to 25 of 2012, lumalabas doon ‘yung ang accuracy rating ay taliwas doon sa R.A. 9369. Sinasabi sa batas na dapat ang accuracy rating nito ay 99.995 percent,” Tuazon said.

But instead of 99.995 percent, Tuazon revealed that the PCOS’ rating was 97 percent.

“So, ‘yung nakikita nating discrepancies, ‘yung probable program errors, lahat ng ito manifestation ng realization na kwestyunable ang accuracy rating ng PCOS system ng Smartmatic,” he said.

Tuazon also pointed out the earlier pattern observed by an Ateneo professor that constantly showed administration bets garnering 60 percent of votes while the opposition and the independent candidates received 30 and 10 percent, respectively.,

“How about ‘yung pattern na nakita 60-30-10, very interesting pattern, although, hindi pa naman conclusive ‘yan. Pero it really raises this question, kung iko-correspond sa sinabi ni Chairman Brillantes, sinabi niya na ‘we decide the result of the election not on the basis of concrete results, but on the basis of projection and anticipated votes.’ I mean, saan galing ‘yung ganung klase?” Tuazon said. — Patricia Denise Chiu/DVM, GMA News

Rule XIII, Art. 62, Art. 63, Art. 64, RULES AND REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT CODE OF 1991

RULE XIII

Local Government Relations With People’s Organizations, Non governmental Organizations, and the Private Sector

ARTICLE 62. Role of People’s Organizations, Nongovernmental Organizations and the Private Sector. — LGUs shall promote the establishment and operation of people’s organizations, NGOs, and the private sector, to make them active partners in the pursuit of local autonomy. For this purpose, people’s organizations, NGOs, and the private sector shall be directly involved in the following plans, programs, projects, or activities of LGUs:

(a) Local special bodies;

(b) Delivery of basic services and facilities;

(c) Joint ventures and cooperative programs or undertakings;

(d) Financial and other forms of assistance;

(e) Preferential treatment for organizations and cooperatives of marginal fishermen;

(f) Preferential treatment for cooperatives development; and (g) Financing, construction, maintenance, operation, and management of infrastructure projects.

ARTICLE 63. Local Special Bodies. —

(a) Local Development Councils — The duly designated representatives of accredited people’s organizations, NGOs, and the private sector operating in the provinces, cities, municipalities, or barangays shall sit as members in the provincial, city, municipal, or barangay development councils, as the case may be. The number of NGO representatives in each LDC shall not be less than one-fourth (1/4) of the total membership of the fully organized council. The local chief executive shall undertake the necessary information campaign to ensure participation of all NGOs operating within his territorial jurisdiction.

(b) Local Pre-qualification, Bids and Awards Committees — Two (2)representatives of people’s organizations or NGOs that are represented in the LDC concerned, to be chosen by the organizations themselves, and a practicing certified public accountant from the private sector, to be designated by the local chapter of the Philippine Institute of Certified Public Accountant, if any, shall sit as members of  the provincial, city, and municipal pre-qualification, bids and awards committees (PBACs).

(c) Local Health Boards — A representative from NGOs or the private sector involved in health services in the province, city, and municipality shall sit as member of the provincial, city or municipal health boards, respectively.

(d) Local School Boards — The representatives of NGOs or the private sector who shall sit as members of the local school boards are as follows:

(1) Provincial school board — the duly elected president of the provincial federation of parents-teachers associations, the duly elected representative of teachers’ organizations in the province, and the duly elected representative of the non-academic personnel of public schools in the province;

(2) City school board — the duly elected president of the city federation of parents-teachers associations, the duly elected representative of teachers’ organizations in the city, and the duly elected representative of the non-academic personnel of public schools in the city;

(3) Municipal school board — the duly elected president of the municipal federation of parents-teachers associations, the duly elected representative of the teachers’ organizations in the municipality, and the duly elected representative of the non-academic personnel of the public schools in the municipality;

(e) Local Peace and Order Councils — The representatives of people’s organizations or NGOs in the local peace and order councils shall be the same as those provided under Presidential EO 309, series of 1988, as amended, and the implementing rules and regulations issued pursuant thereto (Annex B).

(f) People’s Law Enforcement Boards — The representatives of people’s organizations or NGOs who sit as members of the boards shall be the same as those provided under RA 6975, and the rules and regulations issued pursuant thereto.

ARTICLE 64. Procedures and Guidelines for Selection of Representatives of People’s Organizations, Nongovernmental Organizations, or the Private Sector in Local Special Bodies. —

(a) Call for application — Within thirty (30) days from the approval of these Rules and thereafter, within thirty (30) days from the organization of the newly elected sanggunian, each sanggunian concerned shall call all community-based people’s organizations or NGOs, including business and professional groups, and other similar aggrupations to apply with the LGU concerned for accreditation for membership in the local special bodies. The application shall include a duly approved board resolution of the people’s organizations, NGOs or the private sector concerned, certificate of registration, list of officers, accomplishments, and financial data of the organization;

(b) Accreditation — The sanggunian concerned shall accredit the organizations based on the following criteria:

(1) Registration with either the Securities and Exchange Commission, Cooperatives Development Authority, Department of Labor and Employment, Department of Social Welfare and Development, or any recognized NGA that accredits people’s organizations, NGOs, or the private sector. If not formally registered, the said organizations may be recognized by the sanggunian for purposes only of meeting the minimum requirements for membership of such organizations in local special bodies;

(2) Organizational purpose and objectives include community organization and development, institution-building, local enterprise development, livelihood development, capability-building, and similar developmental objectives and considerations;

(3) Community-based with project development and implementation track record of at least one (1) year;

(4) Reliability as evidenced by the preparation of annual reports and conduct of annual meetings duly certified by the board secretary of the organization; and

(5) In the case of PBACs, the organization or any of its members shall have no conflict of interest in the awarding of infrastructure or other projects.

(c) Completion of the accreditation process — The sanggunian shall complete the accreditation process within sixty (60) days from the promulgation of these Rules or within the same period from the organization of the newly elected sanggunian.

(d) Meeting to choose representatives of people’s organizations, NGOs, or the private sector — Within fifteen (15) days after the accreditation process, the DILG field officer assigned in the LGU shall call all accredited people’s organizations, NGOs, or the private sector to a meeting where these organizations shall choose from among themselves which people’s organizations, NGOs or private sector will be represented in the local special bodies. The selected people’s organizations, NGOs or private sector shall then designate their principal and alternate representatives who are residents of the LGU concerned. In no case shall an organization or a representative thereof be a member of more than one local special body within a province, city, or municipality.

(e) Term of office of selected representatives — The term of office of a selected representative shall be coterminous with that of the local chief executive concerned. Should a vacancy arise, the selected people’s organizations, NGOs, or the private sector shall designate a replacement for the unexpired term.

Tula: Mga Katangian Ng Tunay Na Lider

(mga talata halaw sa tula ni Carlos Castro)

Si Haring Solomon ang siyang nagsabi
Ang tunay na lider ay mapagkandili
Hindi bindiktibo at di mapanuri
At kung mag-utos ay hindi parang hari.

Ang hanap kong lider ay handang magbata
Handang magpasakit at handang magdusa
Lahat ng paraan hahanapin niya
Mapaglingkuran lang mga maralita.

Katulad ni Cristo, siya’y mapagmahal
Lalo sa mahirap pati walang dangal
Ginagawa ito di upang ihalal
Kundi dahil sa Diyos sa kanya’y nagmahal.

Sinumang may nais na maging dakila
Dapat siyang maglingkod ng tapat at kusa
Di pinaglilingkurang parang hari’t reyna
Sa gawang mabuti laging nagunguna.

Source: tula ni Carlos Castro

SWS: Corruption In LGUs Rising

MANILA, Philippines — More Filipinos believe that corruption in local government units (LGUs) is more widespread now than in the past year, based on the latest Social Weather Stations (SWS) survey results.

The nationwide 2012 Good Local Governance Survey, conducted among 1,500 household heads from Aug. 20 to 28, found that 56 percent of Filipinos still consider the level of corruption now in the city/municipality government as similar to the level a year ago, 33 percent said it is more widespread now, and 23 percent said it is more widespread last year.

The SWS noted that those who see “a lot” of corruption in the city/municipal government hardly changed from 25 percent this year to 22 percent last year.

As compared to last year, the same offices where corruption is considered most widespread occupy the top three positions, namely, the Budget Office (from 40 percent to 48 percent), Mayor’s Office (from 30 percent to 32 percent), and the Engineer’s Office (from 20 percent to 30 percent).

The SWS also listed the top 11 offices where corruption happens. These are the Treasurer’s Office (27 percent, up from 5th to 6th), Business Permit and Licensing Office (24 percent, stayed at 5th place), Transport and Traffic Management Office (19 percent, up from 7th place), Accountant Office (18 percent, up from 9th place), and Public Market Office (16 percent, up from 12th rank), Barangay Affairs and Public Assistance Center (13 percent, down from 4th place), Assessors Office (13 percent, up from 13th to 14th place), and Agriculture Office (13 percent, down from 8th place).

Over the past three years, Filipinos’ awareness of any anti-corruption effort of the city/municipal government has grown from 26 percent to 35 percent.

The survey also found 73 percent of household heads satisfied, and 14 percent dissatisfied, with the performance of their city/municipal government, for a net satisfaction rating of “very good” +59 (percentage of satisfied minus percentage of dissatisfied).

Net satisfaction ratings are termed as +70 and above, “excellent”; +50 to +69, “very good”; +30 to +49, “good”; +10 to +29, “moderate”, +9 to -9, “neutral”; -10 to -29, “poor”; -30 to -49, “bad”; -50 to -69, “very bad”; -70 and below, “execrable.”

The +59 rating is five points below the very good net rating of +64 (75 percent satisfied, 11 percent dissatisfied) in July 2011, but 15 points above the good +44 (68 percent satisfied, 23 percent dissatisfied in September 2009.

The survey also found 70 percent satisfied and 7 percent dissatisfied with the performance of the Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG), for a very good net satisfaction rating of +63, up by five points from the good +48 (58 percent satisfied, 11 percent dissatisfied) in July 2011.

Very good net satisfaction ratings were also obtained by key local officials and institutions: Governor (down from +67 in July 2011 to +56 in August 2012), Mayor (down from an excellent +73 to +65), Vice-Mayor (down from +68 to +60), Barangay-Chairman (down from an excellent +70 to +63), City/Municipal Council (down from +61 to +57), and City/Municipal Police (hardly moving from +53 to +54).

The 2012 Survey on Good Local Governance was supported through the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) and The Asia Foundation (TAF) Partnership in the Philippines.

By ELLALYN B. DE VERA | October 30, 2012, 7:11pm

Ang Kinatatakutang abuso sa Cybercrime Law, Naganap na

Ang pangamba ng Netizens’ sa Republic Act No. 10175 or the Anti-Cybercrime Act of 2012 ay naganap na.

Bagama’t ang alegasyong kremin o libelo ay ginawa matagal ng panahon, bago paman isabatas ang nasabing batas ito ay may pang-aabusong gianagamit ng may impluwensya, kapangyarihan at may salapi.

Ito ang ginamit laban kay Esperlita Garcia ng Calayan, Gonzaga, Cagayan para aristohin sa kanyang pagpapahayag gamit ang Facebook.

Ang kanyang pagpapahayag sa Facebook ay ginawa nakaraang taon pa. Subalit, siya ay inaresto ngayon lamang Oktobre 16, 2012 kung kailan ang Cybercrime Law na naging kontrobersyal ay pansamantalang wala bisa batay sa TRO na inilabas ng Supreme Court.

Tama at pinatotohanan ng usaping ito ang malaganap na pangamba ng taongbayan na ang Cybercrime Law ay aabusuhin lamang ng mga taong may sapat na salapi at impluwensya sa hukuman at pamahalaan.

Marapat lamang na ang Batas na ito ay tuluyang IPAWALANG BISA ng Korte suprema. ###

Read more from the Source: Cagayan anti-mining leader arrested over Facebook post

Opposition launches new appeals to the poor, gaining ground on populist government in election race.

Amy Prieto was the first member of her family to go to university and she credits the Chavez government for helping her [Christopher Arsenault/Al Jazeera]
Wearing her cap and gown while surrounded by friends and neighbours in this gritty hillside slum on the outskirts of Caracas, Amy Prieto is the first person from her family to graduate from university.

Read more: Chavez support continues in Venezuela slums

Sandigan orders Arroyo arrest

Former President Gloria-Macapagal Arroyo. AP FILE PHOTO

MANILA, Philippines — The Sandiganbayan First Division on Thursday ordered the arrest of former President and now Pampanga Representative Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo and 9 others  in connection with a P300 million plunder case involving the alleged misuse of Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office (PCSO) intelligence funds.

Sandiganbayan Presiding Justice Efren Dela Cruz signed the arrest order and was issued Wednesday at 3 p.m.

Also ordered arrested are her co-accused former General Manager Rosario Uriarte; Sergio Valencia, Manuel Morato, Raymundo Roquero, Jose Taruc V and Ma. Fatima Valdes; former COA Chairman Reynaldo Villar and Region V head Nilda Plaras, and PCSO assistant general manager for finance Benigno Aguas.

Arroyo, who was freed from detention at the Veterans Memorial Medical Center on a P1 million bail last July 25 for an  electoral sabotage case, is facing jail time once again after the Sandiganbayan issued the arrest warrant for the plunder case filed by Ombudsman Conchita Carpio-Morales.

She also posted bail for a graft and corruption case pending before the Sandiganbayan.

Plunder is a non-bailable offense.

The Pampanga lawmaker filed her certificate of candidacy for re-election at a Comelec office in San Fernando, Pampanga Wednesday.

In the complaint, The respondents allegedly conspired in withdrawing, amassing, accumulating public funds worth over P300 million from July 2007 to January 2010.

Uriarte allegedly wrote several letters to Arroyo to authorize her to utilize the intelligence funds for PCSO to help them in conducting intelligence operations.

During the Senate inquiry in 2011, Uriarte said the funds were used to investigate how medicines given to beneficiaries ended up in commercial markets and the creation of measures to counter scams victimizing lotto bettors.

This is the first plunder case filed against Arroyo and the third criminal case filed against her—for electoral sabotage pending before the Pasay City regional trial court and graft and corruption before the Sandiganbayan.

Inquirer News 
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